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Overview

Learning Methods
Students can expect to use up to date technology and interactive online and in-class learning tools that engage students and promote critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Major Focus
The Associate of Arts Degree (Psychology) is 2-year, 60 credit, multidisciplinary program that includes arts courses with a focus on psychology (minimum 18 credits).

The AC Difference
AC students gain from small class sizes and access to instructors with varied expertise in psychology that guarantees AC offers students a wide range of transferable psychology courses.

Career Outlook
Graduates work in many fields, including social work, labour relations, human resources, market research, law, education, health administration, counselling, and urban planning.


Course Descriptions

Select a course below to see full descriptions. (#) Indicates amount of credits per course.

SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociology (3)

An introduction to the discipline of sociology, beginning with an overview of sociological theory and methods. The main part of the course focuses on key substantive areas of the discipline, and compares current Canadian sociological data with findings from elsewhere. Students learn to see themselves and the world in which they live through various sociological perspectives.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 098

Transfers to:
UBC SOCI 1ST (3) - ALEX SOCI 100 AND ALEX SOCI 103 = UBC SOCI 100 (6)
SFU SA 150 (3) B-Soci
UVic SOCI 100A (1.5)
UNBC SOSC 1XX (3)
TRU SOCI 1110 (3)

SOCI 103 Canadian Society (3)

The study of Canada as a developed, ethnically diverse, and multicultural society, with special attention to the adaptation experiences of its Asian immigrant groups and their descendants: Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, and South Asian.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 098, SOCI 100 is recommended

Transfers to:
UBC SOCI 210 (3) - ALEX SOCI 100 AND ALEX SOCI 103 = UBC SOCI 100 (6)
SFU SA 1XX (3) B-Soci
UVic SOCI 103 (1.5)
UNBC SOSC 1XX (3)
TRU SOCI 1210 (3)

SOCI 200 Research Methods in the Social Sciences (3)

An introduction to the design and practice of social research that provides the skills to ask and answer questions about the everyday and changing social world. The course surveys various concepts, research strategies and techniques that enable exploration of the pressing issues of social life.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 098, SOCI 100 or SOCI 103

Transfers to:
UBC SOC 217 (3)
SFU SOCI 255 (3) – Q
Q, UNBC SOSC 2XX (3)

SOCI 210 Crime and Society (3)

An introduction to the study of crime, criminality and corrections in the context of contemporary Canadian society. The aim of the course is to promote critical thinking about official responses to crime.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 098, SOCI 100 or SOCI 103

Transfers to:
UBC SOCI 250 (3)
SFU SA 1XX (3) Soci
UVic SOCI 200 Lev (1.5)
UNBC SOSC 2XX (3)
TRU SOCI 2500 (3)

SOCI 220 Social Movements and Social Change (3)

Social movements are an important means by which ordinary people in civil society organize to shape public policy and bring about social change. They typically represent attempts by the normal powerless to challenge entrenched institutions and dominant members of society. This course will examine some current and historical social movements - reformist, redemptive, and revolutionary - in which people have joined together to struggle for or against social change. Examples of activist collective behaviour will be drawn from many places and times but course materials will focus on contemporary movements in North America and abroad.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 098, one of SOCI 100 or SOCI 103

Transfers to:
UBC SOCI 2ND (3)
SFU SA 2XX (3)
UVic SOCI 316 Lev (1.5)
UNBC SOSC 2XX (3)
TRU SOCI 2XX0 (3)

SOCI 230 Sociology of Popular Culture (3)

What are the patterns, meanings, and rituals in popular culture that shape our lives and serve as a mirror of society? This course will show how the study of popular culture is a window into sociological thinking and an ideal topic for sociological analysis. Through the medium of popular culture (art, music, film, fiction, fashion, television, and the mass media) societal actors both reproduce and resist dominant values propagated by the culture industries in society. By thinking deeply about the ostensibly trivial, and by taking our popular pleasures seriously, the sociological imagination can unveil how we routinely maintain and sometimes challenge powerful social forces such as social inequality. In essence, the course will explore the domain of the popular in order to highlight the political and social debates it mobilizes.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 098, SOCI 100 or SOCI 103

Transfers to:
UBC SOCI 2ND (3)
UNBC SOSC 2XX (3)

SOCI 250 Introduction to Sociological Theory (3)

An examination of the major of five of the pre-eminent social theorists of the 19th and early 20th centuries: Comte, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, and Simmel.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 099, SOCI 100 or SOCI 103

Transfers to:
UBC SOCI 2ND (3)
SFU SA 250 (3)
UVic SOCI 210 (1.5)
UNBC SOSC 2XX (3)
TRU SOCI 2XX0 (3)

Joe Munsterman

Instructor

Joe Munsterman

Instructor

Joe is a graduate of the University of Washington and UBC where he studied both sociology and education.

He has diverse teaching experience in Sociology (Alexander College, UBC, Langara College, Canadian College) as well as being an award-winning instructor (student voted) in the UBC Department of Geography.

He has also helped teach graduate level courses in the Sauder School of Business and currently works in the UBC Faculty of Medicine.

Dr. Samantha May

Instructor

Dr. Samantha May

Instructor

Samantha’s research and teaching experience includes sociology and language revitalization as well as English as a Second Language teaching and academic writing.

After graduating from Simon Fraser University, Samantha gained first-hand experience as an international student while on the Japanese government MEXT program in Okinawa, Japan.

She completed her master’s in Linguistics and Communications and doctorate in Comparative Regional Culture and Area Studies at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa, Japan, and continues her Foundation for Endangered Languages (FEL)-sponsored research on language reclamation in Okinawan cultural arts.

Essya Nabbali

Instructor

Essya Nabbali

Instructor

Essya M. Nabbali is a bilingual health/care researcher, program evaluator, and change strategist, with notable experience in qualitative and community-based methodologies, including long-term ethnographic fieldwork in Accra, Ghana.

She has published in diverse academic journals in the areas of disability, gender, racialization, and colonialist conceptions of “identity."

Among her recent manuscripts is a poetic short story within the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies (in press) and a critical engagement with the sociocultural context of transnational research in Language, Discourse, & Society (2016).

Essya is currently serving as Vice-Chair of the Vancouver Women's Health Collective (VWHC), while also an Associate of the Women’s Health Research Institute (WHRI) embedded within BC Women’s Hospital and Health Care.

Jillian Deri

Instructor

Jillian Deri

Instructor

Jillian Deri, PhD is the author of Love's Refraction; Jealousy and Compersion in Queer Women's Polyamorous Relationships.

She completed her PhD in Sociology at SFU and has taught Sociology & Gender and Women's Studies at UBC Okanagan, SFU, Douglas College and Kwantlen Polytechnic University.

Her research interests include sociology of emotions, gender, sexuality, the body and technology studies.

The Canadian Sociological Association (CSA)

The Canadian Sociological Association (CSA) is a professional association that promotes research, publication and teaching in Sociology in Canada. Its membership comes mainly from sociology departments in Canadian universities, but there is a notable group from other social science departments, community colleges, from a wide range of non-academic settings (government, NGO, and private sector) and from abroad. The total membership is approximately 1,000.

www.csa-scs.ca


The American Sociological Association

The American Sociological Association is the American national organization for sociologists. It is a non-profit membership association based in Washington, DC that is dedicated to advancing sociology as a scientific discipline and profession serving the public good.

www.asanet.org

The International Sociological Association (ISA)

The International Sociological Association (ISA) was founded in 1949 under the auspices of UNESCO. The goal of the ISA is to represent sociologists everywhere, regardless of their school of thought, scientific approaches or ideological opinion, and to advance sociological knowledge throughout the world. Its members come from 126 countries.

www.isa-sociology.or

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We may have your questions answered already! Have you tried these helpful links?


Looking to start the application process?
An online application is now available on Alexander College’s new student portal, myAC. Continue here: Apply to AC